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Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Bakersfield, CA

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Bakersfield, CA

For most men, getting older is a distant thought; a time when bucket-list items are crossed off the list, financial goals are accomplished, and retirement awaits. But then, one day, we wake up and realize that we're not just getting older - we are older. Workouts in the gym start to cause more aches and pains the next morning. Keeping weight off around the midsection is much harder than it once was. Stretching before an impromptu game of basketball isn't just a good idea - it's necessary for you to perform. And that gets to the crux of what men hate most about aging - the inability to perform as they used to, whether it's in the bedroom or on the basketball court.

Unfortunately, there's no avoiding the inevitable. As men age, their testosterone levels deplete, causing a slew of mid-life maladies like:

  • Depression
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of Energy
  • Lack of Interest in Sex
  • Low Sex Drive
  • Can't Hold an Erection
  • Irritability
  • Weight Gain
  • Muscle Loss
  • Hair Loss
  • Nagging Injuries
 TRT Bakersfield, CA

If you're a man in his 30s or 40s, and you feel like you're dragging your feet through life with no upside, don't lose hope. Millions of men just like you are experiencing the same symptoms and feelings that you're suffering through. In fact, almost 75% of men live life with undiagnosed low testosterone.

Unlike those men, however, you don't have to settle for the effects of aging. There are easy, science-backed solutions available to you right now. If you're ready to reclaim the looks and feel of your prime, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) may be for you. TRT in Bakersfield, CA bridges the gap between your old life with low-T and the new, more virile version of you. That's where Testosterone Optimization Program comes in - to facilitate your transition to a new life with optimal testosterone levels. With TOP by your side, you'll have the guidance and tools to get back on track with personalized TRT plans.

But to understand the life-changing benefits of TOP, you've got to first understand testosterone, the symptoms of low-T, and how TRT works to replenish this much-needed hormone.

Service Areas

Trust the TOP Difference

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Did you know that one in five men over the age of 45 exhibit signs of low testosterone? Male testosterone levels begin dropping gradually as soon as age 30. As men age and start to question their sexual health, some of the top symptoms they report are low libido, erectile dysfunction, and delayed ejaculation. When combined, these symptoms can lead men to develop self-image issues, experience poor relationships, and even have a lower quality of life.

But for men living with low-T, a clear path has been paved toward relief. That path starts with the Testosterone Optimization Program. TOP was founded to give men with low-T a new lease on life - one that includes less body fat, fewer performance issues in the bedroom, and more energy. If you're ready to feel and look younger, it's time to consider testosterone replacement therapy from TOP. TRT in Bakersfield, CA, is safe, streamlined for convenience, and personalized to your unique needs. That way, you can age on your own terms and love life as you did in your prime.

Patients choose TOP because we take the time to learn about your low-T symptoms and provide personalized, in-office treatment. Other benefits include:

  • Blood Tests to Determine Low-T Diagnosis
  • Personalized TRT Plans Based on Your Goals
  • No Need for Trips to the Pharmacy
  • In-Office Intramuscular TRT Injections
  • TRT Provided by Licensed Doctors
  • Clean, Comfortable, and Calming TRT Clinic in Fresno
  • Many Men Experience Results Quickly

How the TOP Program Works

Most TRT therapy patients start seeing results just 2-5 weeks after beginning treatment. Some men take just a few months to experience the full benefits of male hormone replacement therapy. Through the treatment plan our low testosterone doctors create specifically for you, they can help alleviate most, if not all, of the symptoms associated with low testosterone.

phone-number 661-727-7481

Latest News in Bakersfield, CA

Sports on TV for Friday, August 25

(All times Eastern)Schedule subject to change and/or blackoutsFriday, August 25AUSTRALIAN RULES FOOTBALL5:30 a.m.FS2 — AFL: Collingwood at Essendon5 a.m. (Saturday)FS2 — AFL: Western at GeelongAUTO RACING6:25 a.m.ESPN2 — Formula 1: Practice, CM.com Circuit Zandvoort, Zandvoort, Netherlands9:55 a.m.ESPN2 — Formula 1: Practice, ...

(All times Eastern)

Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts

Friday, August 25

AUSTRALIAN RULES FOOTBALL

5:30 a.m.

FS2 — AFL: Collingwood at Essendon

5 a.m. (Saturday)

FS2 — AFL: Western at Geelong

AUTO RACING

6:25 a.m.

ESPN2 — Formula 1: Practice, CM.com Circuit Zandvoort, Zandvoort, Netherlands

9:55 a.m.

ESPN2 — Formula 1: Practice, CM.com Circuit Zandvoort, Zandvoort, Netherlands

4 p.m.

USA — NASCAR Xfinity Series: Practice and Qualifying, Daytona International Speedway, Daytona Beach, Fla.

5 p.m.

USA — NASCAR Cup Series: Practice and Qualifying, Daytona International Speedway, Daytona Beach, Fla.

7:30 p.m.

USA — NASCAR Xfinity Series: The Wawa 250 Powered by Coca-Cola, Daytona International Speedway, Daytona Beach, Fla.

5:25 a.m. (Saturday)

ESPN2 — Formula 1: Practice, CM.com Circuit Zandvoort, Zandvoort, Netherlands

COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY

6 p.m.

ACCN — Wake Forest vs. Iowa, Chapel Hill, N.C.

8:30 p.m.

ACCN — Michigan at North Carolina

COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL (WOMEN’S)

5:30 p.m.

BTN — Big 12/Big Ten Challenge: Wisconsin vs. Baylor, Minneapolis

8 p.m.

BTN — Big 12/Big Ten Challenge: TCU at Minnesota, Minneapolis

FISHING

4 p.m.

CBSSN — SFC: The San Juan International Billfish Tournament - Day 2, Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico

GOLF

7 a.m.

GOLF — DP World Tour: The D+D Real Czech Masters, Second Round, Albatross Golf Resort, Prague, Czech Republic

1 p.m.

GOLF — PGA Tour: The TOUR Championship, Second Round, East Lake Golf Course, Atlanta

6:30 p.m.

GOLF — LPGA Tour: The CPK Canadian Women’s Open, Second Round, Shaughnessy Golf Course, Vancouver, British Columbia

9:30 p.m.

GOLF — PGA Tour Champions: The Ally Challenge, First Round, Warwick Hills Golf & Country Club, Grand Blanc Township, Mich. (Taped)

11:30 p.m.

GOLF — Korn Ferry Tour: The Albertsons Boise Open, Second Round, Hillcrest Country Club Inc., Boise, Idaho (Taped)

6:30 a.m. (Saturday)

GOLF — DP World Tour: The D+D Real Czech Masters, Third Round, Albatross Golf Resort, Prague, Czech Republic

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

8 p.m.

ESPN — Lipscomb Academy (Tenn.) at Saraland (Ala.)

HORSE RACING

1 p.m.

FS2 — Saratoga Live: From Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

5:30 p.m.

FS1 — Saratoga Live: From Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

LACROSSE (MEN’S)

10:30 p.m.

ESPN2 — PLL: Atlas vs. Redwoods, Herrimans, Utah

LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL

7 p.m.

ESPN — Little League World Series: Home Run Derby, Williamsport, Pa. (taped)

MLB BASEBALL

7 p.m.

MLBN — Regional Coverage: St. Louis at Philadelphia OR Colorado at Baltimore

7:10 p.m.

APPLETV+ — LA Dodgers at Boston

10 p.m.

MLBN — Regional Coverage: Cincinnati at Arizona OR Atlanta at San Francisco (Joined in Progress)

10:10 p.m.

APPLETV+ — Kansas City at Seattle

NFL FOOTBALL

8 p.m.

CBS — Preseason: Detroit at Carolina

8:15 p.m.

NFLN — Preseason: New England at Tennessee

10 p.m.

NFLN — Preseason: LA Chargers at San Francisco

RUGBY (WOMEN’S)

11 p.m.

FS2 — NRL: Gold Coast at St. George Illawarra

1 a.m. (Saturday)

FS2 — NRL: Wests at Sydney

SOCCER (MEN’S)

7:30 p.m.

FS2 — CPL: Vancouver FC at York United FC

SOFTBALL

8 p.m.

ESPNU — Athletes Unlimited: Team Alexander vs. Team Denham, Rosemont, Ill.

TENNIS

11 a.m.

ESPNEWS — ATP/WTA: The U.S. Open, Qualifying - Third Round, Flushing, N.Y.

2:30 p.m.

TENNIS — Cleveland-WTA, Winston-Salem-ATP Semifinals

TRACK AND FIELD

1:30 p.m.

USA — World Championships: Day 7, Budapest, Hungary

1 a.m. (Saturday)

CNBC — World Championships: Women’s Marathon, Budapest, Hungary

WNBA BASKETALL

8 p.m.

ION — Los Angeles at Atlanta

Community Voices: America’s labor unions reach a historic threshold on Labor Day

On Labor Day 2023, America’s labor unions have reached a threshold.In cities and towns across the nation, working people are waking up to their right to join together and demand the dignity and justice they deserve.We see this play out as our country’s summer of strikes likely will extend into the fall and beyond. At Hollywood studios, hotels, government offices and countless other workplaces, working people recognize their collective power is the best option for improving their jobs and economic welfare.Thro...

On Labor Day 2023, America’s labor unions have reached a threshold.

In cities and towns across the nation, working people are waking up to their right to join together and demand the dignity and justice they deserve.

We see this play out as our country’s summer of strikes likely will extend into the fall and beyond. At Hollywood studios, hotels, government offices and countless other workplaces, working people recognize their collective power is the best option for improving their jobs and economic welfare.

Through unions, American workers can obtain a fair share of the profits made possible by their labor. Through unions, workers can ensure a safe, positive and productive working environment.

Unions have another role as well: a public voice for members and all working people.

This is why ouruUnion, the United Food and Commercial Workers, is calling on regulatory officials at the federal and state levels to reject the proposed merger between Albertsons Companies Inc., owner of Safeway, Vons and Pavilions in California, and the Kroger Family of Companies, which owns Ralphs, Foods Co and Food 4 Less in the state.

If it’s allowed to proceed, this deal would make the combined entity the largest food retailer in the United States with nearly 5,000 stores, more than 700,000 employees and nearly 4,000 pharmacies.

While Kroger and Albertsons, already the country’s two largest supermarket conglomerates, insist grocery prices would go down due to efficiencies of scale, the opposite result is more likely. Most people understand reduced competition means higher prices for consumers.

What’s more, we remember what happened when Albertsons acquired Safeway in 2014. To appease regulators, the merged company sold 146 Albertsons, Pavilions and Safeway stores to a small Northwestern chain called Haggen. While Haggen was a well-meaning union employer, its expansion failed and the company was forced to declare bankruptcy within a year, causing thousands of workers to lose their good union jobs.

We can’t in good conscience support this merger unless we have ironclad guarantees that middle-class jobs will not be jeopardized. Without such guarantees, the Kroger-Albertsons deal could cost American workers more than $300 million annually, according to an analysis by the Economic Policy Institute.

Today’s reenergized spirit of activism shows us the nation’s mood is shifting toward empowering people to fight for a fair balance between corporate profits and workers’ welfare.

Since the time our country was founded, unions have made achieving the American dream a possibility for millions of hard-working people. Sometimes the road to success may seem long and difficult, but when working people are truly united, they can achieve wonders because as our union’s motto says: Solidarity works!

On Labor Day, the nation joins us in celebrating the value of hard work and its fair rewards.

Jacques Loveall is president of UFCW 8-Golden State, which represents workers in supermarkets, drug stores, meat and poultry processing plants, wineries, cannabis shops, medical offices and other workplaces across most of California.

Community Voices: Unlocking potential: Why Leadership Bakersfield is the key to our city’s bright future

In a bustling city like ours, it is imperative to understand the intricate web of industries, the community’s deep-rooted values, and the dynamic nature of our leadership. Leadership Bakersfield, an esteemed program run by the Greater Bakersfield Chamber for the past 36 years, does precisely that. As an alum of the 2018 class and the chair this year, I can attest to the transformative journey the program offers its participants.LB goes beyond conventional leadership programs. It serves as a melting pot where participants from di...

In a bustling city like ours, it is imperative to understand the intricate web of industries, the community’s deep-rooted values, and the dynamic nature of our leadership. Leadership Bakersfield, an esteemed program run by the Greater Bakersfield Chamber for the past 36 years, does precisely that. As an alum of the 2018 class and the chair this year, I can attest to the transformative journey the program offers its participants.

LB goes beyond conventional leadership programs. It serves as a melting pot where participants from different walks of life converge to immerse themselves in the multifaceted layers of our city. From leadership, arts and culture, health services, and agriculture to law enforcement, education and energy sectors, LB gives participants a 360-degree view of Bakersfield’s vibrant ecosystem.

When I took the plunge in 2018, it wasn’t just an educational experience; it was transformative. I was exposed to sectors, information and connections otherwise inaccessible. The program opened my eyes to incredible organizations that deserve our support and granted me an understanding of our government and local industries.

LB isn’t just about taking in knowledge; it’s also about giving back. One of the program’s highlights is the community project. Throughout the year, participants identify a local nonprofit in need, devise a strategy, execute it and present the results. This not only equips them with practical skills but also infuses the spirit of community service, ensuring that every cohort leaves a tangible legacy behind. I still cherish the moments, teamwork and the positive impact we made.

For companies looking to grow future leaders, sponsoring an employee for Leadership Bakersfield is an investment with exponential returns. Employees emerge more aware, skilled and networked, ready to lead in their professional spheres and contribute to the city’s well-being.

From a personal standpoint, my journey through LB was instrumental in carving my leadership path. The program ignited a spark, fostering my leadership skills, helping me find my voice within the community, and giving me the confidence and direction to launch my own business.

For those considering taking a step toward enhanced personal and professional growth, I cannot recommend Leadership Bakersfield enough. And for companies, this is an opportunity to equip your employees with an unparalleled understanding of Bakersfield, priming them for leadership roles.

Applications for the 2024 class are now open, and we’re eager to welcome our next set of city leaders and change-makers. Don’t miss this chance to be a part of Bakersfield’s legacy. Applications are open until Aug. 31. Find out more http://bakochamber.com.

Together, let’s mold the future of Bakersfield.

Christina Springstead is an alumna of the Leadership Bakersfield 2018 class and chair of the class of 2023.

Wednesday's Major League Linescores

AMERICAN LEAGUESeattle0000001030—481Chicago0010020011—5100(10 innings)Kirby, Thornton (6), Weaver (7), Muñoz (9), Topa (10) and O'Keefe, Raleigh; Kopech, Shaw (5), Bummer (7), Santos (8), Navarro (9), S.Peralta (10) and Ca.Pérez, Grandal. W_S.Peralta 2-0. L_Topa 3-4. HRs_Chicago, T.Thompson (6)...

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Seattle0000001030481
Chicago00100200115100

(10 innings)

Kirby, Thornton (6), Weaver (7), Muñoz (9), Topa (10) and O'Keefe, Raleigh; Kopech, Shaw (5), Bummer (7), Santos (8), Navarro (9), S.Peralta (10) and Ca.Pérez, Grandal. W_S.Peralta 2-0. L_Topa 3-4. HRs_Chicago, T.Thompson (6).

Kansas City001210000450
Oakland000000000020

Ragans, Clarke (7), Kowar (8), C.Hernández (8) and Fermin; Martínez, F.Pérez (3), Muller (5), Newcomb (9) and Langeliers. W_Ragans 5-4. L_Martínez 0-2. Sv_C.Hernández (3). HRs_Kansas City, Blanco (1), Witt Jr. (26).

Toronto000000000053
Baltimore00101005x7100

Gausman, G.Cabrera (7), Richards (8), Francis (8) and Kirk, D.Jansen; Kremer, J.Webb (7), Cano (8), Fujinami (9) and Rutschman. W_Kremer 12-5. L_Gausman 9-8. HRs_Baltimore, Santander (23).

Boston0020200003790
Houston12100000015120

(10 innings)

Sale, Whitlock (6), Martin (8), K.Jansen (9), Pivetta (9), Winckowski (10) and Wong, McGuire; Urquidy, S.Martinez (5), Neris (7), B.Abreu (8), Pressly (9), Graveman (10) and Maldonado, Y.Diaz. W_Pivetta 9-6. L_Graveman 3-6. Sv_Winckowski (3). HRs_Boston, Duvall (14). Houston, Maldonado (10).

INTERLEAGUE

Chicago012100011690
Detroit000004000450

Taillon, Rucker (6), Merryweather (7), Alzolay (9) and Gomes; Skubal, Brieske (7), Vasquez (9), Cisnero (9) and J.Rogers. W_Merryweather 5-1. L_Brieske 0-2. Sv_Alzolay (19). HRs_Detroit, K.Carpenter (20).

Minnesota10220100017101
Milwaukee20100210028111

(10 innings)

Maeda, Pagán (6), Thielbar (7), Jax (8), Duran (9) and Jeffers; Burnes, Uribe (7), Payamps (8), D.Williams (9), E.Peguero (10) and Caratini. W_E.Peguero 4-4. L_Duran 2-6. HRs_Minnesota, Lewis (5), M.Taylor (17), K.Farmer (7). Milwaukee, Willi.Contreras (13), Adames (21), T.Taylor (5).

Cincinnati000130401991
Los Angeles2010001004101

Abbott, B.Farmer (5), Young (6), Law (7), Gibaut (7), Cruz (9) and Maile; Ohtani, Ty.Anderson (2), Loup (7), Leone (7), Rosenberg (8) and O'Hoppe. W_B.Farmer 4-5. L_Ty.Anderson 5-5. HRs_Cincinnati, E.De La Cruz (11). Los Angeles, Ohtani (44).

Colorado0000140000580
Tampa Bay00101100216110

(10 innings)

Gomber, Bird (7), J.Lawrence (9), Suter (10) and E.Díaz; Civale, Poche (6), Kittredge (6), J.Lopez (7), Fairbanks (10) and Bethancourt, Pinto. W_Fairbanks 2-4. L_Suter 4-2. HRs_Colorado, E.Díaz (13). Tampa Bay, Arozarena (20), Paredes (25).

Washington000000001132
New York15000030x981

Gore, R.Garcia (5), Ferrer (7), A.Machado (8) and K.Ruiz, Adams; Severino, Hamilton (7), W.Peralta (9) and Higashioka. W_Severino 3-8. L_Gore 6-10. HRs_Washington, Do.Smith (6). New York, Judge (27), LeMahieu (9).

Cincinnati0013000307120
Los Angeles010020000360

Richardson, Moll (5), Sims (6), Cruz (8), Alex.Díaz (9) and T.Stephenson; Detmers, J.Soriano (6), R.López (7), M.Moore (8), Estévez (9) and Thaiss. W_Sims 4-3. L_Detmers 3-10. HRs_Cincinnati, T.Stephenson (10), McLain (15).

NATIONAL LEAGUE

St. Louis3200000016100
Pittsburgh0010110014101

Z.Thompson, Pallante (6), VerHagen (7), Romero (8) and Knizner; Ortiz, Ramirez (4), Hernandez (6), Selby (8) and Delay. W_Z.Thompson 3-5. L_Ortiz 2-4. Sv_Romero (3). HRs_Pittsburgh, Hayes (9).

San Francisco10120010038140
Philadelphia00000200316100

(10 innings)

Cobb, Alexander (6), L.Jackson (6), Wood (7), Ty.Rogers (7), Beck (8), Doval (9), Junis (9), Ta.Rogers (10), R.Walker (10) and Bailey; Lorenzen, Hoffman (6), Strahm (7), Bellatti (9), Kimbrel (10) and Realmuto. W_Junis 4-3. L_Kimbrel 7-4. Sv_R.Walker (1). HRs_San Francisco, Flores (18), DeJong (14). Philadelphia, Schwarber (34), T.Turner (15), Harper (12).

Miami000000000040
San Diego10000210x471

Alcantara, Puk (7) and Stallings, Fortes; Lugo, S.Wilson (7), Suarez (8), Cosgrove (8), Hader (9) and G.Sánchez. W_Lugo 5-6. L_Alcantara 6-11. HRs_San Diego, Bogaerts (14).

New York000000000031
Atlanta10000420x7120

Quintana, Bickford (6), Reid-Foley (8) and F.Alvarez; Morton, Tonkin (8), Yates (9) and Murphy. W_Morton 13-10. L_Quintana 1-5. HRs_Atlanta, Ozuna (28).

Officials assess damage in Hilary’s aftermath

Records were set in Kern County as rainfall from Tropical Storm Hilary caused flooding and mudslides, canceled classes and closed roads across the state’s southern half.The National Weather Service in Hanford said Monday morning that the Bakersfield metropolitan area set a daily record for rainfall Sunday, recording 1.21 inches of rain while the areas of McFarland, Pond and Lamont each saw, in varying degrees, about an inch or less of rain. Some of Kern’s desert areas received more than 5 inches of precipitation.Spo...

Records were set in Kern County as rainfall from Tropical Storm Hilary caused flooding and mudslides, canceled classes and closed roads across the state’s southern half.

The National Weather Service in Hanford said Monday morning that the Bakersfield metropolitan area set a daily record for rainfall Sunday, recording 1.21 inches of rain while the areas of McFarland, Pond and Lamont each saw, in varying degrees, about an inch or less of rain. Some of Kern’s desert areas received more than 5 inches of precipitation.

Sporadic thunderstorms are expected to linger in parts of Kern County through Tuesday morning.

As of 4:31 p.m. Monday, 33 county roads were closed to the public, according to Kern County Public Works. Nearly 200 customers in Kern County were experiencing a power outage Monday, with the largest outage being near Taft Highway, impacting 63 customers, according to Jeff Smith, a spokesman for Pacific Gas and Electric Co.

Areas most affected by the storm were in eastern Kern, in the county’s desert and mountain communities like Tehachapi and Ridgecrest, where waterways can be overwhelmed easier and result in flooding.

“Those higher elevations definitely took the brunt,” said Jessica Chiari, a meteorologist with the weather service.

The first rainfall from the storm began to fall in the Tehachapi Valley on Saturday afternoon as the town was filled with thousands of visitors for the 60th annual Tehachapi Mountain Festival. Festival events scheduled for Sunday were canceled, and Saturday night’s rodeo was shut down just before it started because of to safety concerns.

“This is more than double any previous 24-hour period recorded since the district has been keeping such records,” said Tom Neisler, general manager of Tehachapi-Cummings County Water District, “For the month of August 2023, we have measured 5.04 inches of rain at our office. From 1995 until 2022, the previous maximum rainfall in August was 0.39 inches in 2022. The average rainfall for August during that period was 0.08 inches.”

A Red Cross evacuation center set up in the gymnasium at the Tehachapi Education Center, at the corner of Snyder Avenue and Tehachapi Boulevard, had one overnight guest Sunday night — a traveler — and a few others earlier in the storm. On Monday, officials said the shelter and another in Ridgecrest would remain open until further notice.

“We anticipate more people to come by today,” Taylor Poisall, a communications director for the Red Cross’ Central California Region, said Monday. “For now it will remain open and everyone is welcome.”

Chiari said rainfall in these areas was about as expected, with 3 inches in Mojave, 4.58 inches in Tehachapi and 5.25 inches in Ridgecrest between Sunday and Monday morning. That said, the storm did arrive a day earlier than expected, in a hastened advance from Mexico into California — the first tropical storm to do so since 1997.

“It originally looked like a majority of that precipitation was going to hit (Monday),” Chiari said. “The storm did go through quicker than we thought it would.”

Residents and officials said Monday they are still assessing the impact of the storm, which brought 50 mph winds and lashing rains to the county’s eastern quarters.

“It’s hard to paint it with a brush stroke,” Kern County Fire spokesman Andrew Freeborn said. “It was all areas throughout the desert, all areas throughout Ridgecrest, road closures all over the place.”

Schools in Tehachapi Unified School District were closed Monday and Cerro Coso Community College closed campuses, including in Tehachapi.

No reports of deaths or major injuries have been confirmed by authorities. According to Freeborn, Kern Search and Rescue teams carried out six separate rescue operations on Sunday, including two that required a helicopter to evacuate trapped residents.

One of those rescues was for a driver hoisted from his tractor-trailer along Highway 58 after a mudslide rushed across all four lanes Sunday evening and buried the vehicle up to its windshield.

“And someone tried to drive through it this morning and they got caught up in it, too,” said Caltrans District 9 spokeswoman Christine Knadler.

Highway 58 is among the three state-operated roads in Kern that either closed or were subject to detour.

Knadler said crews were working Monday to clear mud and debris from Highway 58 east of Tehachapi. At least one eastbound lane reopened to allow travel on the highway to resume. As of 2:45 p.m. Monday, Highway 58 was reopened from Cameron Road to Tower Line, though closures remain from Cameron Canyon to Exit 165 as Caltrans crews continued to dig out mud.

Similar work was being done for Highways 14 and 178, both of which saw flooding on Sunday. Crews reopened the southbound half of Highway 14 on Monday, while Highway 178 remained closed in both directions from the Kern-San Bernardino County line near Ridgecrest to Pinnacle Road near Trona.

“We are concentrating on the mainlines right now — 395, 14, and 58 — with crews working to assess other state routes,” Knadler said. “But we have to get to the main routes first.”

Many drivers were observed on their Monday morning commute using Tehachapi Willow Springs Road, known locally as “the backroad” connecting Highways 58 and 14. Officials said Monday that driving tractor-trailers on the road, while not illegal, is ill-advised because the road has many hills and sharp turns.

Highway 58 was closed shortly after 7 p.m. Sunday between Sand Canyon Road and Randsburg Cutoff Road following a day of heavy rains that, hours earlier, prompted the Kern County Fire Department to issue an evacuation order in Sand Canyon because of worries the area’s only access road would become impassable because of Tropical Storm Hilary.

Officials attribute the closure to Cache Creek, which runs through the center of Sand Canyon, a community east of Tehachapi. Waters overflowed there Sunday, sending muddy water gushing and stranding some residents on Pine Canyon Drive.

Closures were not exclusive to motorists on Monday, according to Meg Ronspies, a spokeswoman for Union Pacific Railroad. She said two routes in and out of the Los Angeles Basin were closed due to “washouts and floodwater over the rail.” Several trains are being held while crews clear the water.

Ronspies said trains were also impacted by Sunday’s earthquake — a magnitude 5.1 quake originating in Ojai 90 miles from Bakersfield. The delay was brief and operations resumed in that area.

Freeborn said that, for now, evacuation orders remain in place for the community of Sand Canyon.

It’s also too early to tell whether crops were impacted in Kern. Through several media inquiries forwarded Monday, farmers and industry experts said they are still assessing the damage, while hope, along with the storm’s final effects, linger.

“It’s too early to tell on most crops,” Kevin Andrew, senior vice president at Bakersfield-based Illume Agriculture, said in an email Monday. “We had a slow steady rain, which helps on grape crops versus hard driving rain. But the damage from decay usually takes a few days to manifest itself.”

And countywide, Kern residents awoke this morning to a breezy, stark blue sky and 68 degrees, with some lingering humidity that the weather station said should return to normal by Thursday.

Freelance reporters Claudia Elliott and Nick Smirnoff contributed to this report.

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